Catalog of Lessons by Category > Teachers’ Knowledge, Preparation, and Passion > Humanities/Interdisciplinary

Catalog of Lessons by Category > Teachers’ Knowledge, Preparation, and Passion > Humanities/Interdisciplinary 2017-10-04T02:45:58+00:00
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Earlier this year, during my senior year of high school, I enrolled in the elective art history class, and I was really looking forward to it, because it was with one of my favorite teachers. Not only was she easy to talk to, invested in her students’ success, and extremely intelligent, but she also truly loved art and helping others be passionate about art as well. An instance that is most memorable to me is when we were discussing an abstract work by Paul Gauguin with so much symbolism in the work it made my head spin. But Ms. [teacher name] really got us engaged in a discussion when she assured us that we were quite capable of dissecting the painting and discovering its meaning and cultural significance as a class.

One of the things that I realized that day was how effective she was as a teacher because she truly had confidence in us as students. She would often give us long and difficult readings or quotations from art historians and artists to read and understand for homework. When we were finished with them, she would set up an online forum in which we would discuss aspects of the article that we found interesting or even disagreed with. For these assignments, I felt that I was being treated as an adult because Ms. C. truly wanted to hear what I had to say, and I felt that my opinions and thoughts were really valid. In a similar sense, she fostered class discussions and encouraged us to state our observations about a work of art, no matter how trivial or basic they may seem. I have learned so much from her: how to be a better writer and thinker, and how to appreciate art more thoroughly. And most importantly I learned that a good teacher is encouraging of her students in the way that she interacts with them; that is, when a teacher challenges her students, it shows utmost respect for them and shows them that you are invested in their success.